Bridge improvment

Just thought I would talk about my violin bridge making I did over the last few days , I was experimenting with three violin bridges I had laying around , so I sanded them down to violin specs , carved out the kidney holes , I carved all of them for low string height for easy play , and one of them actually worked better than my original that came with my violin , more volume , easier double stops , better balance all around , However , Now all mistakes are amplified , cause twice as sensitive to the touch of the bow , at the same time easier to play , So I carved the other two bridges as close to the successful bridge as I could to the eye and they both turned out great too so now I have backup bridges  for my main violin , Anyway the tone is richer than ever and twice as loud , My violin played well before , But better now , So now I am the proud Papa of a new and improved same old violin ! It really is crazy what a bridge can do for a violins tone , volume , and ease of playing all notes and the good ole double stops ! I had made lots of bridges over the last two years , that were just ok but not special and no real improvements in sound , So I had given up on making violin bridges till now , goes to show , if you don't succeed the first 10 times try and try again !  So great Christmas present to Me ! now I will embark on my other three violins I own to see if I can make the magic work on them as well ! I have not tried to record anything yet with the new sound so that's next to post before Christmas to show and tell ! Wish me luck !

Comments

  • Oh cool! Glad it worked for you, look forward to hearing it!

    Luck!
  • Cool.  Glad you were successful! Yeah it does make a big difference.  I looked all that up awhile back and handed a bridge to Mike and told him everything I know about it and what I thought I wanted.  I was very pleased with his amateur attempt...I need to learn for myself, too, though.
  • One thing I've been thinking about lately, speaking of this do-it-yerself luthier type stuff, is about replacing or reparing the nut in order to allow for better string spacing.  Somebody was asking about that on FHO the other day, and made me think that I really need to do something about my problems with that.  I have a Suzuki fiddle I bought just before I was getting ready to retire, when I also bought the presonus...thinking I'd get poor later and better load up on music stuff, time to actually learn to play the fiddle, etc., etc., etc.  So anyway, I never could do much with that Suzuki...so right away I bought a more expensive fiddle, thinking the fiddle had to be the problem, not me...lol.  Well, after a few years, I realized I was right about that.  Didn't realize why until fairly recently...on the Suzuki, the nut has the string slots too close together and I just can't mash down on one string without getting another one...so can't get clear-sounding drones or double stops.  On the newer one...from california...although not really expensive, but more than the Suzuki...I could do it.  Well to make a long story short, I ended up buying a fiddle somebody I know who lives in town found in her neighbor's trash...buying it off of her.  Well that is the easiest one to play...and I realized it has two great features I love...the neck is very skinny...but...weirdly enough, the string spacing on the nut slots is bigger than either of the other two fiddles. You'd think there'd be some standard, but apparently not...I don't know.  Whatever, anyway, I got curious after somebody on FHO brought up an issue they were having and looked up and saw on youtube you can fill in the slots and recut slots farther apart, or just replace the nut with one that has better measurements.  So...once things get slowed down here at our house for wintertime, after the holidays, etc., gotta get Mike to figure out how to widen string spacing on that Suzuki first, and see if I can play that thing better after that.
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